August 2015


Rebeca Monzo, 12 July 2015 — This plant is native to the Mediterranean region. Its name comes from the Latin term, “salvare,” which means to cure. In English it is known by the name of “sage.” Despite having multiple uses, it is famous mostly has a culinary herb. It has also been utilized for thousands of years as a medicine.

It is an aromatic plant belonging to the labiate family (lamiaceae). These plants grow in bushes measuring some 30-40 cm in height, and they are cultivated in fields, orchards or gardens. It’s leaves are of a velvety grayish-green, with attractive flowers that are colored in lilac, purple or green. It requires rich soil, good drainage, and sunlight.

Its active agents are distributed throughout the entire plant, which makes its leaves, stems and flowers usable. Its fresh leaves can be used to make extracts for gargling. The essential oils of salvia include thuja, camphor and eucalyptus. It also contains bitter components such as tannin (rosmarinic acid), flavonoids, and substances that produce an anti-perspirant and estrogenic effect.

It is often used to treat respiratory infections, nasal congestion, cough, tonsillitis, and as an effective anti-inflammatory. It stimulates the appetite (when ingested as an infusion), relieves indigestion and has a beneficial effect on the liver, relieves urinary tract problems (cystitis), and in some women it relieves the discomforts of menopause.

Interesting fact:

When brushing the teeth, add ground-up salvia leaves to the dentifrice. Salvia, a powerful antiseptic, helps to eliminate bacterial plaque and acts as a disinfectant, and strengthens bleeding gums.

Tips:

It is recommended to all those who have trouble falling asleep, to make a small pillow stuffed with dried salvia leaves, and place it at the base of the head at bedtime, to achieve a restorative sleep.

If you do not have a garden, where one of these bushes would be indispensable, it is recommended to prepare a large flowerpot with charcoal placed at the base for good drainage, filled with enriched soil to sow this plant, then placed in full sun. Its features make it, as well, a good ornamental shrub.

Translated By: Alicia Barraqué Ellison 

Rebeca Monzo, 12 August 2015 — I am one of those people who believe the opening created by the US government and the entrenched Castro regime, no matter how insignificant it might at first appear, cannot help but widen until it brings down the great ideological wall erected by island’s totalitarian regime over the past fifty-six years.

The restoration of relations with the government of the United States, which will be officially inaugurated on August 14, has brought a ray of hope to the long-suffering and suppressed Cuban people.

I can fully understand those who feel truly hurt and reject this opening, not only because their property was taken from them, but also because they were separated from their families, forcing them into unwanted exile. But I also understand that the great majority of the Cuban population has grown old or died waiting for change.

Though it may be hard to believe, a segment of the population which remained on the island has recently begun to express its dissatisfaction in subtle and peaceful ways. People now challenge the government through the use of American symbols, displaying the stars and stripes on their clothes, accessories, cars and privately owned work vehicles.

Though they might well be carted off by the police if they said publicly what they were thinking privately, the vast majority of the population silently welcomes this first contact with our neighboring country, which has long been spoken of with reproach in sick and hateful propaganda campaigns

I feel that for us — the dissidents and free thinkers who have put a face to protest on the island —  the way these meetings between the two governments have been conducted are a disappointment. However, I understand that they an important first step and that there will be no turning back.